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  • 22 Jan 2021 1:56 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Linda Laban, Boston Real Estate (MA)

    Community-focused, environmentally friendly living.


    That’s how Hall and Moskow Property Management and Development describes its ambitious net-positive Hillside Center for Sustainable Living in Newburyport, which recently completed phase one.

    Given that the development is located on a former brownfield site, once a dump for coal ash and trucks and cars, a massive cleanup operation preceded the construction of the development, let alone any edible plantings.

    “We pulled 110 semis worth of soil out of here. What’s left is clean,” Hall confirmed.

    For the entire article, see

    http://realestate.boston.com/new-developments/2021/01/19/hillside-newburyport-rentals/

    Posted January 22, 2021

  • 20 Jan 2021 10:00 AM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    By Tim Faulkner, ecoRI News (RI)

    The Lonsdale Company left behind a legacy of pollution. It’s just now being completely remediated. (DEM Bureau of Environmental Protection photos.

    A nearly 200-year-old hangover from the Industrial Revolution is finally getting cured, as the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) cleans a stubborn oil leak along the Blackstone River in Rhode Island.

    The 30-acre Lonsdale mill complex and village in Lincoln and Cumberland dates back to 1831 with the construction of mills, homes, and amenities for workers. Most of it was built in a floodplain. The precursor to today’s live-work community was started by Nicholas Brown Jr., the namesake of Brown University, and his future brother-in-law Thomas Ives to became one of the largest mill complexes in the country.

    For the entire article, see

    https://www.ecori.org/pollution-contamination/2020/11/15/more-cleanup-of-chronic-pollution-at-historic-mill-site

  • 20 Jan 2021 9:59 AM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    A long-awaited dredging of the Gowanus Canal in Brooklyn, a Superfund site, has begun in earnest. It may not be finished for at least a decade.

    By Mihir Zaveri, New York Times

    In the middle of the Gowanus Canal, across from a luxury apartment complex and waterfront promenade, a yellow excavator was perched atop a floating barge. Again and again this week, it plunged its claw into the murky water, emerging each time with a scoop of fetid black muck. After more than 150 years, the famously filthy canal in Brooklyn is finally being cleaned out.

    Since the mid-1800s, industrial pollutants, raw sewage and storm runoff have accumulated in the waterway, making it one of the most contaminated in the country. As the surrounding industrial wasteland gave way in recent decades to gleaming apartments, and as restaurants and bars popped up on streets dominated by warehouses and parking lots, the noxious sediment — known as “black mayonnaise” because of its color and consistency — lurked below the water’s surface.

    Now the canal is undergoing its own transformation. The Environmental Protection Agency has begun a $1.5 billion project to remove the sludge and clean the Gowanus.

    For the entire article, see

    https://www.nytimes.com/2020/11/19/nyregion/gowanus-canal-dredging-redevelopment.html

  • 19 Jan 2021 12:57 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    By Cody Shepard, Brockton Enterprise (MA)

    The city has received a $250,000 state grant to remove toxic materials from the vacant downtown Corcoran Supply Company property, which officials say is the first step toward redeveloping the property into downtown housing.

    The Corcoran Supply Company is a three-story, 65,000-square-foot building located on 1.2 acres of downtown property at 308 Montello St.

    The property is considered a brownfield and the grand funds will be used to assess and remediate issues related to fuel storage tanks, contaminated soil, asbestos and lead paint, which have all made the site unfit for use.

    "Removing these pollutants will clear the way for the property to be developed into 62 new units of workforce and affordable housing for the city," Mayor Robert Sullivan's office said in a statement.

    For the entire article, see

    https://www.enterprisenews.com/story/news/environment/2021/01/05/brockton-corcoran-supply-company-building-downtown-property-brownfield-cleanup-grant-housing/4125843001/

    Posted January 19, 2021

  • 19 Jan 2021 12:56 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    By Jonathan D. Epstein, Buffalo News (NY)

    McGuire Development Co. wants to turn a longtime tool factory in North Buffalo into apartments, adding to the growing residential options in a new neighborhood that's being dubbed "Chandlerville."

    The Buffalo-based development firm plans to renovate the 33,000-square-foot Buerk Tool complex at 293-315 Grote St. into 33 market-rate apartments.

    The two-story brick building will include one- and two-bedroom units, with the exact sizes and rents still to be determined, said McGuire President Danielle Shainbrown.

    For the entire article, see

    https://buffalonews.com/news/local/mcguire-plans-rehab-of-north-buffalo-tool-factory-into-apartments-near-chandlerville/article_3b02904e-503d-11eb-8720-6b96dd7c68d8.html

    Posted January 19, 2021

  • 19 Jan 2021 12:52 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    By Thomas J. Prohaska, Buffalo News (NY) 

    For years, contaminated sites in Niagara County have been, in effect, exempt from property taxes, because the county wouldn't foreclose on them if the taxes went unpaid.

    The reason was that taking title to a brownfield or other polluted site – or even one thought to be contaminated – would make the county liable for the costs of cleaning up the site.

    Now the county says it has struck an agreement with the state Department of Environmental Conservation under which the county can foreclose on as many as 86 contaminated or possibly contaminated sites without being stuck with the remediation cost.

    For the entire article, see

    https://buffalonews.com/news/local/dec-may-allow-niagara-county-to-foreclose-on-contaminated-sites-without-paying-to-clean-them/article_27896b2a-438e-11eb-81bb-43de6d24ce37.html

    Posted January 19, 2021

  • 18 Jan 2021 5:13 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Good example of local government integrating brownfields, housing and economic revitalization.

    https://salisburync.gov/Government/Community-Planning-Services/Community-Plans/Brownfields-Program

    Posted January 18, 2021

  • 11 Jan 2021 4:32 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    By Cody Shepard, Brockton Enterprise (MA)

    The city has received a $250,000 state grant to remove toxic materials from the vacant downtown Corcoran Supply Company property, which officials say is the first step toward redeveloping the property into downtown housing.

    The Corcoran Supply Company is a three-story, 65,000-square-foot building located on 1.2 acres of downtown property at 308 Montello St.

    The property is considered a brownfield and the grand funds will be used to assess and remediate issues related to fuel storage tanks, contaminated soil, asbestos and lead paint, which have all made the site unfit for use.

    "Removing these pollutants will clear the way for the property to be developed into 62 new units of workforce and affordable housing for the city," Mayor Robert Sullivan's office said in a statement.

    For the entire article, see

    https://www.enterprisenews.com/story/news/environment/2021/01/05/brockton-corcoran-supply-company-building-downtown-property-brownfield-cleanup-grant-housing/4125843001/

    Posted January 11, 2021

  • 04 Jan 2021 10:22 AM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    by Valley Breeze (RI)

    The city recently received $484,400 in brownfields remediation grants for cleanup at three polluted sites around the city, including two sites proposed for reuse as solar farms.

    The largest grant was $292,800 for the redevelopment of the former Seville Dye property on First Avenue. The funds will be used to install a bioventing remedial system on the city-owned site to address petroleum-impacted soils. The city has proposed a 1.5-megawatt solar array for the site.

    Another grant of $100,000 was awarded for site preparation at 92–176 Sunnyside Ave, two adjacent former industrial parcels the city has also proposed for reuse as a solar farm.

    For the entire article, see

    https://www.valleybreeze.com/2020-12-22/woonsocket-north-smithfield/city-wins-brownfields-grants-solar-farm-sites#.X-esBC1h1p8

    Posted January 4, 2021

  • 21 Dec 2020 3:18 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Waste Today promotes the benefits of brownfield redevelopment projects.

    Converting hazardous sites into flourishing properties comes with a long list of unknowns.

    On top of the potential risks, conversion can involve years of hard work, financial challenges and even legal constraints that hinder making the vision a reality.

    However, Mark Thimke and Bruce Keyes, attorneys at Milwaukee-based Foley & Lardner LLP who specialize in brownfield redevelopment, say numerous laws have changed in the past decade to create more resources and further simplify the process of breathing new life into brownfields—properties that are difficult to redevelop or reuse due to the presence of hazardous substances, pollutants or contaminants.

    Read more...

    Posted December 21, 2020

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