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  • 19 Jan 2021 12:57 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    By Cody Shepard, Brockton Enterprise (MA)

    The city has received a $250,000 state grant to remove toxic materials from the vacant downtown Corcoran Supply Company property, which officials say is the first step toward redeveloping the property into downtown housing.

    The Corcoran Supply Company is a three-story, 65,000-square-foot building located on 1.2 acres of downtown property at 308 Montello St.

    The property is considered a brownfield and the grand funds will be used to assess and remediate issues related to fuel storage tanks, contaminated soil, asbestos and lead paint, which have all made the site unfit for use.

    "Removing these pollutants will clear the way for the property to be developed into 62 new units of workforce and affordable housing for the city," Mayor Robert Sullivan's office said in a statement.

    For the entire article, see

    https://www.enterprisenews.com/story/news/environment/2021/01/05/brockton-corcoran-supply-company-building-downtown-property-brownfield-cleanup-grant-housing/4125843001/

    Posted January 19, 2021

  • 19 Jan 2021 12:56 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    By Jonathan D. Epstein, Buffalo News (NY)

    McGuire Development Co. wants to turn a longtime tool factory in North Buffalo into apartments, adding to the growing residential options in a new neighborhood that's being dubbed "Chandlerville."

    The Buffalo-based development firm plans to renovate the 33,000-square-foot Buerk Tool complex at 293-315 Grote St. into 33 market-rate apartments.

    The two-story brick building will include one- and two-bedroom units, with the exact sizes and rents still to be determined, said McGuire President Danielle Shainbrown.

    For the entire article, see

    https://buffalonews.com/news/local/mcguire-plans-rehab-of-north-buffalo-tool-factory-into-apartments-near-chandlerville/article_3b02904e-503d-11eb-8720-6b96dd7c68d8.html

    Posted January 19, 2021

  • 19 Jan 2021 12:52 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    By Thomas J. Prohaska, Buffalo News (NY) 

    For years, contaminated sites in Niagara County have been, in effect, exempt from property taxes, because the county wouldn't foreclose on them if the taxes went unpaid.

    The reason was that taking title to a brownfield or other polluted site – or even one thought to be contaminated – would make the county liable for the costs of cleaning up the site.

    Now the county says it has struck an agreement with the state Department of Environmental Conservation under which the county can foreclose on as many as 86 contaminated or possibly contaminated sites without being stuck with the remediation cost.

    For the entire article, see

    https://buffalonews.com/news/local/dec-may-allow-niagara-county-to-foreclose-on-contaminated-sites-without-paying-to-clean-them/article_27896b2a-438e-11eb-81bb-43de6d24ce37.html

    Posted January 19, 2021

  • 18 Jan 2021 5:13 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Good example of local government integrating brownfields, housing and economic revitalization.

    https://salisburync.gov/Government/Community-Planning-Services/Community-Plans/Brownfields-Program

    Posted January 18, 2021

  • 11 Jan 2021 4:32 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    By Cody Shepard, Brockton Enterprise (MA)

    The city has received a $250,000 state grant to remove toxic materials from the vacant downtown Corcoran Supply Company property, which officials say is the first step toward redeveloping the property into downtown housing.

    The Corcoran Supply Company is a three-story, 65,000-square-foot building located on 1.2 acres of downtown property at 308 Montello St.

    The property is considered a brownfield and the grand funds will be used to assess and remediate issues related to fuel storage tanks, contaminated soil, asbestos and lead paint, which have all made the site unfit for use.

    "Removing these pollutants will clear the way for the property to be developed into 62 new units of workforce and affordable housing for the city," Mayor Robert Sullivan's office said in a statement.

    For the entire article, see

    https://www.enterprisenews.com/story/news/environment/2021/01/05/brockton-corcoran-supply-company-building-downtown-property-brownfield-cleanup-grant-housing/4125843001/

    Posted January 11, 2021

  • 04 Jan 2021 10:22 AM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    by Valley Breeze (RI)

    The city recently received $484,400 in brownfields remediation grants for cleanup at three polluted sites around the city, including two sites proposed for reuse as solar farms.

    The largest grant was $292,800 for the redevelopment of the former Seville Dye property on First Avenue. The funds will be used to install a bioventing remedial system on the city-owned site to address petroleum-impacted soils. The city has proposed a 1.5-megawatt solar array for the site.

    Another grant of $100,000 was awarded for site preparation at 92–176 Sunnyside Ave, two adjacent former industrial parcels the city has also proposed for reuse as a solar farm.

    For the entire article, see

    https://www.valleybreeze.com/2020-12-22/woonsocket-north-smithfield/city-wins-brownfields-grants-solar-farm-sites#.X-esBC1h1p8

    Posted January 4, 2021

  • 21 Dec 2020 3:18 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Waste Today promotes the benefits of brownfield redevelopment projects.

    Converting hazardous sites into flourishing properties comes with a long list of unknowns.

    On top of the potential risks, conversion can involve years of hard work, financial challenges and even legal constraints that hinder making the vision a reality.

    However, Mark Thimke and Bruce Keyes, attorneys at Milwaukee-based Foley & Lardner LLP who specialize in brownfield redevelopment, say numerous laws have changed in the past decade to create more resources and further simplify the process of breathing new life into brownfields—properties that are difficult to redevelop or reuse due to the presence of hazardous substances, pollutants or contaminants.

    Read more...

    Posted December 21, 2020

  • 15 Dec 2020 3:40 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Detailed economic analysis for the University of Chicago matches high resolution housing data and remediation benefits to conclude positive economic results.

    Kevin HaningerLala Ma, and Christopher Timmins

    Abstract

    The US Environmental Protection Agency Brownfields Program awards grants to redevelop contaminated lands known as brownfields. This paper estimates cleanup benefits by combining administrative records for a nationally representative sample of brownfields with high-resolution, high-frequency housing data. With cleanup, we find that property values increase by an average of 5.0% to 11.5%. For a welfare interpretation that does not rely on the intertemporal stability of the hedonic price function, a double-difference matching estimator finds even larger effects of up to 15.2%. Our various specifications lead to the consistent conclusion that Brownfields Program cleanups yield positive, statistically significant, but highly localized effects on housing prices.

    Read more...

    Posted December 15, 2020

  • 23 Nov 2020 12:43 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    The Trust for Public Land makes the case for re-use as public spaces and surrounding economics will respond.

    By Peter Harnik and Ryan Donahue

    Back in 1975, the rusted pipes and immense corroded tanks of Seattle’s Gas Works Park seemed bizarre and incongruous against its verdant lawns. If old factory brownfields were repellent, and green parks were alluring, how could the two ever mate? But the imagina- tive flash by landscape architect Richard Haag broke that mold, and the reuse of that polluted property gave rise to an icon.

    Read more...

    Posted November 23, 2020

  • 16 Nov 2020 3:54 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    A critique of the Brownfields concept from the Lincoln Institute.

    Nancey Green Leigh

    Because many brownfield sites are located in areas with depressed property values, the cost of remediation and redevelopment can be greater than the expected resale value. These sites, referred to here as low-to-no market value brownfields, are rarely addressed under current policies and programs. Rather, the current practice of many brownfield redevelopment projects is to select only the most marketable sites for remediation and redevelopment, essentially perpetuating the age-old "creaming" process. Private and public developers' avoidance of the lowest market value parcels typically excludes disadvantaged neighborhoods from programs aimed at redeveloping brownfields and creates the potential for widening existing inequalities between better-off and worse-off neighborhoods.

    Read more...

    Posted November 16, 2020


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